consider including a warning on each page of the website explaining the position of your company regarding the use of the site. In this way, users will know at least what uses are allowed (for example, if they can create links to the site, download and print material from the site and under what conditions), and who to contact to obtain the corresponding authorization.

Control Access To The Content Of Your Company’s Website, As Well As Its Use: technological protection measures six may be used that limit access to the works published on your company’s website only to users who accept specific conditions for use them or have paid for it. The techniques listed below are usually used:

If your company hires a person to create your website, who is the owner of the copyright?

If your company’s website has been created by your employees in the course of their duties, in most countries, you (the employer) will own the copyright on the site, unless you have agreed otherwise with your employees. Things change when it comes to small businesses.

Most companies commission the creation of the design or content of their website to external contractors and assume that they are the holders of the IP rights existing on the site for having paid for the completion of the work. However, it is possible that this is not the case, and that your company takes more than one surprise in that regard. In general, independent contractors (as opposed to company employees) hold IP rights over the works they create, even if their company has paid for them unless otherwise provided in a written contract.

What this means in practice is that the independent creator of websites is usually the owner of the copyright and other IP rights over the created site, as well as the design and elements that are part of the latter (for example, the colors, the graphics files of “gif” and “jpeg” format, the configuration, the hyperlinks and the text coding). If a valid written agreement is not established in which those rights are assigned, it is possible that your company ends up enjoying only a non-exclusive license to use your website.